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Best Money Apps for Teens—Our Top Picks


Best Brokerage Account + Debit Card for Teens
Best Investing Account With a Prepaid Card
Best Debit Card for Customer Service
4.9
4.8
4.4
Free (no monthly fees).
Core: $4.99/mo. Max: $9.98/mo. Infinity: $14.98/mo. (Each account supports up to 5 children.)
30 days free. Individual: $4.99/mo./child. Family: $9.98/mo. for up to 4 children.
Best Brokerage Account + Debit Card for Teens
4.9
Free (no monthly fees).
Best Investing Account With a Prepaid Card
4.8
Core: $4.99/mo. Max: $9.98/mo. Infinity: $14.98/mo. (Each account supports up to 5 children.)
Best Debit Card for Customer Service
4.4
30 days free. Individual: $4.99/mo./child. Family: $9.98/mo. for up to 4 children.

Best Money Apps for Under 18: Investing Apps

1. Fidelity Youth™ Account (Free Money App + Investing App With Debit Card)


fidelity youth account art 2024

  • Available: Sign up here
  • Price: No account fees¹, no account minimum, no trading commissions*
  • Platforms: Web, mobile app (Apple iOS, Android)

Is your teen interested in jumpstarting their financial future? Do you want them to build smart money habits along the way?

Of course you do! Learning early about saving, spending and investing can pay off big when you start on the right foot. And one tool that can help your teen get that jump is the Fidelity Youth Account—an account for teens 13 to 17 that’s designed to help them start their money journey. Teens own the account themselves and can start investing in most U.S. stocks, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and Fidelity mutual funds for as little as $1!³

Your teen will also get a free debit card with no subscription fees, no account fees, no minimum balances, and no domestic ATM fees². And they can use this free debit card for teens to manage their cash and spend it whenever they need.

And as for building smart money habits? You and your teen can access the account through the Fidelity Youth™ app, which has a dedicated Learn tab packed with materials developed specifically to help teens develop good financial habits. Not only will Fidelity’s interactive lessons, videos, articles, tools, and calculators accelerate their learning—but for every level they complete, reward dollars will be deposited into their account to use however they want.

Controls parents want and need

A parent or guardian must have or open a brokerage account with Fidelity® to open a Fidelity Youth Account. For new Fidelity® customers, opening an account is easy, and there are no minimums and no account fees.

Having a Fidelity account gives parents and guardians access to plenty of tools they can use to monitor their teen’s activity: They have online account access, can follow monthly statements and trade confirmations, and can view debit card transactions made in the account.

To make it even easier, you can set up alerts to notify you of your teen’s trades, transactions, and cash management activity, keeping you firmly in the loop on actions your teen takes across the Fidelity Youth Account’s suite of products.

If your teen has an interest in learning about investing, becoming smarter about money, and taking their first steps toward building their financial journey, you should consider downloading the Fidelity Youth app and opening a Fidelity Youth Account. The account comes custom-built for their needs, which will help them become financially independent and start investing for their future.

Read more in our Fidelity Youth Account review.

 

2. Step (Best Free Money App for Teens)


Step signup new nocode

The free Step Visa Card is a unique “hybrid” secured credit card that’s tailor-made for kids and teens. It has the safety of a debit card, but it functions like a Visa credit card—including the ability to build your child’s credit history.

Parents, who sponsor the card for their child, add money to this FDIC-insured account and can determine how their child can spend. A regular Step account allows a child to have both a physical spending card as well as a virtual card in the Step app, while a Parent Managed Account only allows the child to spend via a physical card. Either way, they can use their card anywhere Visa is accepted. Children can also use their cards to withdraw money from more than 30,000 ATMs for free.

And parents needn’t fear that their child will overdraft—they can’t spend any money they don’t have.

Further, the Step Card comes protected by Visa’s Fraud Protection and Zero Liability guarantee. That means if your teen’s card gets lost or stolen, or misplaced and fraudulent charges crop up, you can dispute the charges within a certain time frame to avoid liability for paying.

The Step Card also boasts a great savings tool for kids. Any money up to $250,000 saved in a Savings Goal can generate 5% in annual interest (compounded and paid monthly) with a qualifying direct deposit*. And with Savings Roundup, small purchases are rounded up to the nearest dollar figure; that extra money is put toward a savings goal. (Example: Your child buys a cup of coffee for $2.75; Step rounds up to $3.00 and puts 25 cents toward a goal.)

Step even features an “invest” function that allows children age 13 and older to buy and sell Bitcoin for a small transaction fee. They can also earn Bitcoin (or cash) rewards when they opt into offers from companies like Hulu, Chick-Fil-A, CVS, and The New York Times. The app is not a pure crypto wallet, however—your kids currently can’t spend Bitcoin directly at vendors.

One of the most unique and powerful features of the Step card is its ability to build your child’s credit history. With this optional feature, Step will report the past two years’ worth of information—transactions, payment history, and more—to the credit bureaus when your child turns 18. That can greatly improve their chances of starting adult life with a better credit score, which can help lower the cost of things like student loans and auto insurance.

And Step is absolutely free: No monthly fees, no subscription fees, no account minimum fees, and no ATM fees within Step’s network of 30,000-plus ATMs.

Read more in our Step review.

For Step disclaimer, please see the fine print at the bottom of this article.

 

3. Greenlight App (Best Premium Money App for Teens)


greenlight sign up new

  • Available: Sign up here
  • Price: Free 1-month trial, $4.99/mo. after for up to five kids

Greenlight started as a money app for teens focused on helping kids manage their money while establishing parental oversight.

Greenlight works like a prepaid debit card. You can choose how much money to load onto the card and it will be cleared to make approved purchases so long as a money balance backs up the card.

But Greenlight provides parents with control over where their teens can spend money by limiting the stores where their cards work. Parents also can receive alerts when money is spent.

Teens who want extra money can request it and even include a photo of the purchase they want to make. Teenagers who have jobs can add their own funds to the card as well.

And the Greenlight card is accepted at any ATM that accepts Mastercard, Visa, Interlink or Maestro cards. (Just note that most ATMs charge withdrawal fees, and these fees will be charged per withdrawal.)

The Greenlight debit card for teens is a good choice for parents interested in teaching kids about money, including the importance of saving money and being prudent with their personal finances. It can also be used to build teenage money management skills.

This financial product can be an effective learning tool for helping kids to understand why saving should be a priority. It can also be used to simplify paying an allowance or tracking chores.

Greenlight also has numerous safety features. Your child needs permission to move money out of the account. Further, Greenlight encrypts data and pictures of your child, preventing that information from being accessed by anyone but yourself. Each Greenlight card comes with a PIN number (like a traditional debit card). And every account is FDIC-insured.

Consider Greenlight’s debit card if you want to have control over what your kids buy and also teach them about responsible spending.

 

4. Copper Card (Best Financial Literacy App for Managing Money)


copper banking

  • Available: Sign up here
  • Price: Variable pricing on Copper and Copper + Invest plans

Copper Banking was founded on the belief that kids and teens should have equal access to financial education and should be empowered to learn by doing. Now, the company is on a mission to help children gain real-world experience by giving them access to their money in a way that traditional banks can’t.

The Copper app and debit card teaches your child how to make smart financial decisions by creating a platform where parents and their kids can connect. With the Copper app, you get easy snapshots of your accounts. And with the Copper Debit Card, it’s easy to shop in-store or online, including with Apple Pay or Google Pay.

Plus, users get exclusive access to engaging advice curated by a team of financial literacy experts who provide tips on how to take control of their financial future.

Copper Banking Features:

  • Send/Request: Kids and parents can easily send and receive money all at the touch of a button.
  • Spend: Spend using Apple or Google Pay, or using the Copper Debit Card.
  • Withdraw: Access your money from more than 55,000 fee-free ATMs.
  • Monitor: Get a snapshot of all your child’s spending in an easy-to-read dashboard.
  • Save: Gain quick snapshots of your kid’s savings and helpful tips on how to save even more. Set up savings buckets and save for the things that you want.
  • Learn: With the help of Copper’s team of financial literacy experts, gain bite-sized tips on how you can maximize your money and prepare yourself for your financial future.

The basic Copper account includes the above banking features. With Copper + Invest, your child also gets access to automatically curated smart portfolios built with their preferences in mind. Your child is given a questionnaire that helps Copper determine a portfolio based on their age, income, net worth, investment objective(s) and investment horizon. Copper then recommends one of three ETF portfolios—Moderately Aggressive, Aggressive, and Extra Aggressive—made up of thousands of stocks. Parents can review the portfolio to ensure it matches with not just your child’s preferences, but your family’s. (Portfolios can be changed later on by accessing the Support chat.)

Your child can begin investing for as little as $1, then add more contributions down the road. Copper will automatically rebalance the portfolio as needed to make sure it always keeps up with your child’s investment preferences.

Copper is available to kids 6 years and older.

Read more in our Copper Banking review.

 

Best Money Apps for Teens: Bank Accounts + Debit Cards

5. GoHenry (Best Budgeting App for Teens)


gohenry signup acorns new

  • Available: Sign up here
  • Price: 1 month free. Individual: $4.99/child/mo. Family: $9.98/mo. for up to four children

GoHenry is a banking app for teens that’s paired with a debit card for each of your children. Your online account is linked to each one of your children’s individual accounts, and you can manage all of the money held in each account—as well as set parental controls—via the company’s app or online account portal.

When you open a GoHenry account, you’ll receive your children’s debit cards in the mail seven to eight business days later. Then you can set up an automatic weekly allowance transfer into your children’s accounts, as well as establish one-off or weekly spending limits to keep their spending in check. You can also choose the stores where your kids can shop, and you can easily block/unblock the card.

Another great feature of GoHenry is that your children can spend only the money available on the card, meaning you don’t need to worry about incurring costly overdraft fees or accruing debt.

With time, the controls provided by the GoHenry app and the guidance you offer can help your kids to earn, save, spend, and give more intelligently and responsibly.

Learn more by reading our GoHenry debit card review.

 

6. Revolut <18 (Best for Parent-Paid Bonuses)


revolut under 18 signup

Revolut <18 is a prepaid debit card for kids designed to teach them money skills for life. Aimed at building healthy money habits from an early age, the unique, customizable card empowers parents to have full insight into their kids’ card activity through providing instant spending alerts and parental controls.

You can choose to freeze the card, set controls on how they use the cards online and with contactless payments through your Revolut app. Further, you can set spending limits on how much your child can use with the prepaid card.

Parents use the card and accompanying app to teach kids about earning, budgeting, saving and even investing money (depending on the plan chosen). You can also use the card to manage chores and allowance, set savings goals as a family and help your children manage their money.

And if your child did something deserving of a reward? You can send parent-paid bonuses when they complete specific tasks. Simply add money to their digitized piggy bank through the app. You can send and receive money in seconds through Revolut’s Payments feature, which allows instant transfers between account holders and also global transfers at transparent rates.

Of note, you must have a personal Revolut account before you can open a Revolut <18 account for your children. You can add up to five Revolut <18 accounts per parent account.

To learn more about Revolut <18, consider visiting their site and opening an account for yourself and your child.

 

Do Money Apps for Teens Provide Money Management Resources?


What distinguishes a generic money app from a money app for teens is the focus toward building financial literacy and providing approachable money management resources.

Whether it’s to help teenagers save money, learn about budgeting, or better understand the basics of finance, many money apps for teens come loaded with useful resources that can help them better manage their finances. These resources can include items such as educational articles, videos and tutorials, gamified experiences, or informational activities, all of which explain financial concepts like credit cards and debit cards, investing, spending or saving—even taxes.

And to make parents feel comfortable knowing these resources are helpful for guiding teens on the prudent financial path, some money apps also offer features that enable parents to monitor their child’s spending or allow teens to set saving goals and track their progress.

Ultimately, money apps for teens can be incredibly useful tools for teaching young people about sound money management in a way that is both engaging and accessible.

Should Teens Use Budgeting Apps to Learn How to Spend Money Wisely?


Absolutely! Using budgeting apps are one of the best ways for teens to learn how to spend money wisely. With a variety of features that help track expenses and income, budgeting apps can be useful to monitor spending and provide valuable insight into where money is being spent and how to make better financial decisions.

While not a substitute for developing your own personal finance skills, budgeting apps can be an effective way to manage money.

Can Teens Open an Investment Account by Themselves?


In the world of investing, teenagers aren’t allowed to open investment accounts by themselves due to legal restrictions, even through investing apps targeted specifically toward teens. Instead, they’ll need the assistance of an adult to open an investment account. (The law prohibits minors from entering into legally binding contracts, including investment accounts.)

Despite the legal condition, this doesn’t mean teenagers are completely barred from investing in the stock market. In fact, they have several options available to them, all of which require the help of an adult. The three primary means for a teen to invest money through an investment account include:

  • Joint brokerage accounts enable teens to invest alongside their parents or guardians, sharing ownership of the account.
  • Custodial brokerage accounts are managed by an adult custodian who acts as a legal guardian and oversees the minor’s investments until they reach the age of majority.
  • Custodial individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are geared toward teens who want to save for retirement. Like custodial brokerage accounts, these accounts are also managed by an adult custodian who oversees the contributions made into the account. Once the minor reaches adulthood, they can take over management of the account and continue making contributions towards their retirement. Teens will need earned income to contribute to an IRA.

Terms and Conditions for Fidelity Youth™ Account

The Fidelity Youth Account can only be opened by a parent/guardian. Account eligibility limited to teens aged 13-17.

* $0.00 commission applies to online U.S. equity trades and Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) in a Fidelity retail account only for Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC retail clients. Sell orders are subject to an activity assessment fee (from $0.01 to $0.03 per $1,000 of principal). Other exclusions and conditions may apply. See Fidelity.com/commissions for details. Employee equity compensation transactions and accounts managed by advisors or intermediaries through Fidelity Clearing & Custody Solutions® are subject to different commission schedules. 

¹ Zero account minimums and zero account fees apply to retail brokerage accounts only.  Expenses charged by investments (e.g., funds, managed accounts, and certain HSAs) and commissions, interest charges, or other expenses for transactions may still apply. See Fidelity.com/commissions for further details.

² Your Youth Account will automatically be reimbursed for all ATM fees charged by other institutions while using the Fidelity® Debit Card at any ATM displaying the Visa®, Plus®, or Star® logos. The reimbursement will be credited to the account the same day the ATM fee is debited. Please note, for foreign transactions, there may be a 1% fee included in the amount charged to  your account. The Fidelity® Debit Card is issued by PNC Bank, N.A, and the debit card program is administered by BNY Mellon Investment Servicing Trust Company. These entities are not affiliated with each other, and Fidelity is not affiliated with PNC Bank or BNY Mellon. Visa is a registered trademark of Visa International Service Association, and is used by PNC Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc.

³ Fractional shares quantities can be entered out to 3 decimal places (.001) as long as the value of the order is at least $0.01.  Dollar-based trades can be entered out to 2 decimal places (e.g. $250.00)

Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917


Terms and Conditions for Step

Step is a trademark of Step Mobile, Inc.

About the Author

Riley Adams is the Founder and CEO of WealthUp (previously Young and the Invested). He is a licensed CPA who worked at Google as a Senior Financial Analyst overseeing advertising incentive programs for the company’s largest advertising partners and agencies. Previously, he worked as a utility regulatory strategy analyst at Entergy Corporation for six years in New Orleans.

His work has appeared in major publications like Kiplinger, MarketWatch, MSN, TurboTax, Nasdaq, Yahoo! Finance, The Globe and Mail, and CNBC’s Acorns. Riley currently holds areas of expertise in investing, taxes, real estate, cryptocurrencies and personal finance where he has been cited as an authoritative source in outlets like CNBC, Time, NBC News, APM’s Marketplace, HuffPost, Business Insider, Slate, NerdWallet, Investopedia, The Balance and Fast Company.

Riley holds a Masters of Science in Applied Economics and Demography from Pennsylvania State University and a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Finance from Centenary College of Louisiana.